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Owners Replacing Butterfield 8 In White Plains With BBQ Franchise

Jennifer Sousou
Jennifer Sousou Photo Credit: Brian Donnelly
Debbie Lublin, a lifelong White Plains resident, was happy a barbecue place is opening.
Debbie Lublin, a lifelong White Plains resident, was happy a barbecue place is opening. Photo Credit: Brian Donnelly

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – With newspapers covering its signature large windows, residents passing Butterfield 8 on Wednesday wondered what happened to the upscale restaurant at the corner of Mamaroneck Avenue and East Post Road.

The restaurant owners recently bought a Brother Jimmy’s BBQ franchise, which will take the place of Butterfield 8 when renovations are complete.

Debbie Lublin, a lifelong White Plains resident, said there aren’t enough barbecue restaurants in the area. She said she is looking forward to the new addition, especially because it is unique to Mamaroneck Avenue. But, she was sad to see Butterfield 8 go.

“That’s crazy,” she said. “The food and the atmosphere, it was not like the rest. It was more classy, upscale. It was a lot different.”

Danielle Omara and Laurie Besen, who both work in White Plains, said they worry that Brother Jimmy’s will attract a younger crowd compared to Butterfield 8, which both said they enjoyed for the food and atmosphere.

“It was different,” she said. “Even the crowd at night after work was older, so you didn’t have the college kids coming and running amok. And I heard the brunch was really nice, too.”

Mayor Thomas Roach was happy that the Butterfield 8 owner is staying in White Plains with a new business, which also has six New York City locations including one in Yankee Stadium. It also has one in New Jersey and three in south Florida.

Kathy Patrick, who works in White Plains, said she liked the atmosphere at Butterfield 8, but didn’t share the enthusiasm for its food. Like Patrick, Jennifer Sousou, who ate lunch next door at Haiku Wednesday, said the restaurant was usually quiet, if not empty.

With several food places closing in recent months, including Pancheros, Energy Kitchen and Cheeburger Cheeburger, some residents weighed in on what they would like to see. Omara and Besen didn’t hesitate with their suggestion for a juice bar akin to Yonkers’ Juices for Life.

Sousou said Mamaroneck Avenue already has Mexican food with Lola’s Kitchen, Asian food with Haiku and the soon-to-open Red Plum, and that it needs a Middle Eastern restaurant with hookah.

What type of business do you think Mamaroneck Avenue needs?